What is Project Management and How To Do It

Dick Billows, PMP
Dick Billows, PMP
CEO 4pm.com
Dick’s Books on Amazon

What is project management? It’s a process for producing a predefined result, called a deliverable, on time and within budget. A deliverable can be a highway, an office building, a computer software, a medical records system, a book, a full-length movie and many other things. A project has a specific start and finish date. It is not an on-going effort like managing the organization’s accounting department.

What is Project Management: It Involves Special Techniques

There are special techniques for managing projects and they start with creating a plan. The project plan is a document that details what the project is going to deliver (the scope). It is created by the person who wants the project done (the sponsor) and the person who will manage the effort (the project manager). It also defines what resources the project manager needs and how he/she will manage the people working on the project. The project manager meets with people affected by the project, called stakeholders, and learns what they require the project to produce. As the project manager breaks down the scope and requirements into smaller deliverables, they are developing a pyramid of clearly defined deliverables that lead from the smallest tasks up to the largest deliverables. At the top of the pyramid is the project scope. Good project managers focus on deliverables that are defined by metrics.  Here’s an example of a deliverable defined by a metric, “Design a payroll data entry screen with 25 data fields that allow payroll clerks to enter 65 payroll transaction per hour.”  A deliverable that is based on metrics has a number of very important benefits. First, when the project manager assigns deliverables to the project team members, they know exactly what is expected of them before they start work. They don’t have to guess or worry about failing on their assignment because the PM has defined what a good job is in measurable terms.  With that type of assignment, a team member can break it down more accurately and use their experience to plan their approach to their deliverable.

Second, using deliverables as the basis for the project lets the project manager and team members develop much more accurate estimates of the duration anWhat is a Project Managementd cost of each task. It also lets the PM determine how long the entire project will take and what it will cost. Another effective tool is the work package. The project manager should give each team member a work package which describes their deliverables and details the risks and other factors that will affect their assignment. Then PM and team member use that same work package to develop an estimate of the amount of work in their deliverable(s). This gives the team member something very much like a contract; it explains the expectations the team member must meet.

Third, managing a project that is built with deliverables gives the PM unambiguous checkpoints to measure how the project is doing versus the approved plan. Each deliverable has a crystal-clear and measurable definition of success so the project manager, sponsor and stakeholders don’t have to guess about the project’s progress. After the project plan is approved, the PM executes it by assigning work to the team members to ensure all the project deliverables get produced. As the team is working on their deliverables, the PM is monitoring their progress, controlling the project schedule, budget and scope and solving any problems. As part of this monitoring and controlling process, the project manager makes periodic status reports to the sponsor who initiated the project. During the executing phase, deliverables are reviewed and accepted as they are produced. The project stakeholders and sponsor examine what the team produced, compare it to the specifications and accept or reject the deliverables. The PM doesn’t wait until the end of the project for the stakeholders to review the deliverables. He/she does it as they are produced so they can identify and fix problems early.

Fourth, with measured deliverables as a basis for the project plan and schedule, the project manager can do a better job quantifying the impact of change requests. Using the example above, if the user wants to increase the number of fields on the payroll data entry screen from 25 to 30, the PM can use the metric along with project software and revised work estimates to quickly assess the impact of this change on the project budget and completion date.

After the last of the deliverables has been produced, the project manager closes the project by verifying with the sponsor that the project delivered what they wanted. The project manager will also archive all the data generated by the project so it can be used by other project managers in the future. That information will make it easier to plan similar projects.

What is Project Management: It’s Leading and Managing People

In addition to these planning and workflow management techniques, the project manager also has to lead, motivate and manage the project team. And they must build support from other executives in the organization for the project. Last but not least, the project manager has to “manage” the project sponsor who very often will outrank the project manager by several levels. Managing the sponsor requires a great deal of subtlety and tact if the project manager is to ensure that the sponsor plays their important role in defining the scope and controlling the project.

To learn more about how to use these tools and techniques, consider our online project management courses. You begin whenever you wish and work privately with Dick Billows, PMP, an expert project manager. You control the schedule and pace and have as many phone calls and live video conferences as you wish.

At the beginning, when you and Dick talk to design your program and what you want to learn, you will select case studies that fit the kind of projects you want to manage. Chose you course and then select the which specialty case study from business, or marketing,  or construction, or healthcare, or consulting.  That way your case studies, project plans, schedules and presentations will fit your desired specialty.

  1. 101 Project Management Basics
  2. 103 Advanced Project Management Tools
  3. 201 Managing Programs, Portfolios & Multiple Projects
  4. 203 Presentation and Negotiation Skills
  5. 304 Strategy & Tactics in Project management

 

Project Manager Role Producing Deliverables

The project manager is responsible for producing a specified deliverable using organizational staff & materials.  The project manager role requires a wide variety of skills in planning, leading, scheduling, tracking progress and managing teams to produce that specific deliverable. This set of skills is very different from managing a department or a business.

Dick Billows, PMP
Dick Billows, PMP
CEO 4pm.com
Dick’s Books on Amazon

Project Manager Role: Different Than Other Managers

Several things make a project manager’s job different. Working on the project is often not the team member’s full-time job. They may work on several different projects managed by different project managers or have a position in a functional area. Because of this, the project team often is not very committed to achieving the project’s goal. So the project manager must use their leadership and communication skills to motivate these team members.

Project managers must also build support for the project among the stakeholders. Stakeholders are the people who will be affected by the project. Very often the stakeholders are executives in the organization who have an interest in the project because it affects their area of responsibility. Project managers must be able to persuade stakeholders to loan their people to the project and possibly supply other kinds of support. What makes it more difficult is that the project manager is usually a relatively low ranking employee and has no formal authority over stakeholders.

The project manager role also requires technical skills and knowledge that are relevant to the project. The project manager does not have to be the most knowledgeable expert on technical issues. It’s not a problem if members of the project team have more technical expertise than the project manager. That’s why they’re needed on the team.

The project manager role requires the ability to use the special tools and techniques of project management. These include running the planning and status report meetings, scheduling people and tasks to finish the project as soon as possible, spotting variances to the plan and optimizing the schedule to finish as soon as possible. These tools and techniques can be quite complex, especially when managing a larger project. Becoming a project manager requires a lot of learning as well as mastering leadership and communication skills. These are the keys to a project manager’s success.

At the beginning, when you and Dick talk to design your program and what you want to learn, you will select case studies that fit the kind of projects you want to manage. Chose you course and then select the which specialty case study from business, or marketing,  or construction, or healthcare, or consulting.  That way your case studies and project plans, schedules and presentations will fit your desired specialty.

  1. 101 Project Management Basics
  2. 103 Advanced Project Management Tools
  3. 201 Managing Programs, Portfolios & Multiple Projects
  4. 203 Presentation and Negotiation Skills
  5. 304 Strategy & Tactics in Project management

 

Dysfunctional Teams – Video

Dick Billows, PMP
Dick Billows, PMP
CEO 4pm.com
Dick’s Books on Amazon

During the course of their career, every project manager has to deal with dysfunctional teams. The people on the team may be in that state as a result of bad experiences on previous projects. You may have inherited them when you took over a failing project. The dysfunctional team is unlikely to produce satisfactory project results. Leading Teams Main Page

Time is often wasted in turf battles between team members from different functional units. People also spend inordinate amounts of time trying to avoid blame for the project failure that they see coming down the road. Finger-pointing will also be rampant. All these behaviors destroy morale. Dysfunctional project teams can cause major overruns on a project’s duration and budget.

But there are techniques that project managers can use to salvage a dysfunctional project team and turn it into a high performing team.

Watch this video on how to deal with a dysfunctional project team.

How To Manage a Dysfunctional Team - Video

You’ll learn all of those skills in our project management basics courses. Take a look at the basics course in your specialty.

At the beginning, when you and Dick talk to design your program and what you want to learn, you will select case studies that fit the kind of projects you want to manage. Chose you course and then select the which specialty case study from business, or marketing,  or construction, or healthcare, or consulting.  That way your case studies and project plans, schedules and presentations will fit your desired specialty.

  1. 101 Project Management Basics
  2. 103 Advanced Project Management Tools
  3. 201 Managing Programs, Portfolios & Multiple Projects
  4. 203 Presentation and Negotiation Skills
  5. 304 Strategy & Tactics in Project management

Project Management Success

Project Management Success is not easy. There are several project manager skill sets or techniques that make a project manager successful. Successful project managers have both “hard” and “soft” skills in their project tool belt. They are able to select the appropriate tools and techniques to use on every project they manage. The ability to select the right tools prevents overloading small projects with too much paperwork and meetings. It also lets the  project manager decide which sophisticated tools to use on the big projects. Project Management Skills Main Page

Dick Billows, PMP
Dick Billows, PMP
CEO 4pm.com
Dick’s Books on Amazon

In addition to the “hard” project management skills, there are a number of “soft” skills that consistently successful project managers possess. Project Management Success requires effective communicators. That’s important with project team members who must clearly understand what’s expected of them on their tasks. Project managers’ communications with stakeholders must also be effective so the project manager can persuade and influence these people to support the project. Project managers also have to be good motivators to build project team enthusiasm and morale. These “soft” skills and abilities are extensive and show how far project managers have come from the days when they were viewed solely as technical experts.

There are eight critical skill sets you need for Project Management Success. You must be able to:

#1 – Work with the sponsor to identify the business result the project must produce

#2 – Create a schedule using project management software

#3 – Estimate work (duration and cost) with the team members

Project Management Success#4 – Make clear assignments so each team member knows what is expected
#5 – Track progress against the plan and solve problems early (before it’s too late)

#6 – Run meetings for planning and status reporting

#7 – Make presentations to sponsors and stakeholders

#8 – Archive data (planned and actual) for use on future projects.

You learn all of those skills in our project management basics courses. Begin whenever you wish and work individually with your instructor at your pace and schedule.Take a look at the basics course in your specialty.

At the beginning, when you and Dick talk to design your program and what you want to learn, you will select case studies that fit the kind of projects you want to manage. Chose you course and then select the which specialty case study from business, or marketing,  or construction, or healthcare, or consulting.  That way your case studies and project plans, schedules and presentations will fit your desired specialty.

  1. 101 Project Management Basics
  2. 103 Advanced Project Management Tools
  3. 201 Managing Programs, Portfolios & Multiple Projects
  4. 203 Presentation and Negotiation Skills
  5. 304 Strategy & Tactics in Project management

 

Project Variances, Solve Just the Real Problems

Work Breakdown Structure
Dick Billows, PMP
CEO 4PM.com

Project variance is what gives executives nightmares about project failure. They are the calculated difference between the approved project plan’s costs and duration and the actual project results. We can have project variance vs.  schedule where we identified that a task should have been finished by July 1 and it was actually finished by July 5. That’s a four day bad variance. We can also have project variance on the project budget. Let’s say a task was planned to cost $5,000 and it actually cost $4,500 when we were done. That’s a $500 good variance.  Project Tracking Reports Main Page

We can also have project variance on the characteristics of the deliverable and on the planned work versus the actual work. The most important thing about project variances is we do not have to wait until the task is completed to identify a variance. Project managers get information from their team members’ status reports. Using project management software, they take the information about the actual results versus the plan and they forecast variances when the task is done. That allows the project manager to start corrective action before the task is actually finished.

Another major use of project variance is in status reporting to the project sponsor. Having the variance data allows the project manager to show the sponsor how the project is going and what tasks are on schedule and what tasks are not. One of the techniques that separates consistently successful project managers from the rest of the pack is their ability to identify problems early, when they are small and easily solved. Unsuccessful project managers are routinely surprised by big problems that they find out about when it’s too late to fix the damage that’s been done.

The important thing to remember when your project sponsor becomes hysterical about a variance is that we do not have to take corrective action about every variance. If we have a 5 day variance on a task’s forecasted completion date, We do not have to order overtime for the whole team.  If you have used professional scheduling techniques, you will be able to quickly determine if the task is on the critical path and if not how much slack it has. I the task has 10 days of slack you should do nothing about the variance because the slack can absorb it and it will not affect the project completion date. You also need to check if the variance is a signal of a growing problem. But that is an example of when we can ignore a variance.

A few prudent steps during project planning can make all the difference. To spot problems early, you need unambiguous, measurable checkpoints in the project so you don’t have to guess whether you’re on track. With the deliverables defined by metrics, you will know exactly where you are. That’s what lets you take action at the first sign of a problem. Do you want to be regularly surprised by problems when it is too late to fix them or do you want to spot problems early and fix them before they mushroom? How to Write a Weekly Status Report

At the beginning, when you and Dick talk to design your program and what you want to learn, you will select case studies that fit the kind of projects you want to manage. Chose you course and then select the which specialty case study from business, or marketing,  or construction, or healthcare, or consulting.  That way your case studies and project plans, schedules and presentations will fit your desired specialty.

  1. 101 Project Management Basics
  2. 103 Advanced Project Management Tools
  3. 201 Managing Programs, Portfolios & Multiple Projects
  4. 203 Presentation and Negotiation Skills
  5. 304 Strategy & Tactics in Project management

Project Launch – Sell the Project and Build Political Support

Dick Billows, PMP
Dick Billows, PMP
CEO 4pm.com

The project launch meeting is an opportunity for you, the project manager, and the sponsor to build enthusiasm for the project among the project team and the project stakeholders. The team members are the people who will be doing the project work. The stakeholders are the people affected by the project. Other attendees are managers affected by the deliverables the project produces. Vendors who do contract work on the project may be included as well. Keep in mind that some of the attendees might be people who are not in favor of your project because it is using resources they need elsewhere.  Instead of dreading this meeting, you should view it as an opportunity to convert people who are neutral or opposed to the project. It is also an opportunity to increase the level of enthusiasm of the people who now support the project.

Unfortunately, the launch meeting is often just a series of long speeches about teamwork, sharing and supporting each other. No one in the room believes that hype. These lofty speeches don’t build morale. They tend to undermine it because the opening discussion is full of phony sentiments and, sometimes, outright lies. Good project managers don’t give speeches about teamwork, honesty and supporting each other. They communicate those characteristics by their actions. This takes more time but it’s much more believable and valuable.

In the launch meeting, you communicate information about your carefully developed plan. You state the major deliverables of the project and the overall benefit to the organization. The project launch meeting is not the time to threaten team members with dire consequences if they are late on their assignments. Those threats convince the team that their number one goal is to avoid blame when the project fails. That sort of attitude is crippling for a project. Team members who think the project will fail do not give you their best efforts.

Project Launch: Meeting Agenda

Here is the information to cover in the project launch meeting:

  • Project overview
  • Projet scope
  • Major deliverables
  • Project milestones

Project Launch: Meeting Attendees

These people should attend the launch meeting:project launch meeting

  • Project sponsor
  • Project manager
  • Project team members
  • Major project stakeholders

The project launch meeting signifies the end of the project planning phase and the beginning of the executing and monitoring/controlling phases.  You must make sure that by the end of this meeting, the team members understand how the tasks they will work on fit into the big picture, the project scope. You also want to build enthusiasm and commitment to the project among the team members and stakeholders.

Learn how to run a project launch meeting in our training seminars for clients  or our instructor-led online courses for individuals.

 

Project Team Ground Rules

Project team ground rules are a necessity. Almost all project teams have frequent meetings and even more frequent communication in various forms. If the project manager doesn’t set ground rules for these meetings and communications, a significant amount of time is lost. Together, the project manager and team identify and formulate the ground rules that members of the team should follow when they interact. These rules cover video conferences, in person-meetings and telephone conferences. The ground rules can cover a wide range of team member and project manager behavior.ground rules

Project Team Ground Rules: Examples

The ground rules may include the “completed staff work” concept. That approach to meetings aims at substantially reducing the amount of time the team members waste when people at the meeting are not ready to discuss the topics. The completed staff work concept is based on an agenda. Anybody can add an item to the agenda. The only requirement is that they distribute materials to all the team members before the meeting. That allows everyone to come ready to discuss the issue. Another rule is that you cannot raise an issue at the meeting that was not on the agenda with preparatory materials distributed. These rules help avoid bad decisions being made when people have not had time to thoroughly consider the issues.

Other ground rules may deal with interpersonal conflict. As an example, a ground rule may prohibit discussing work issues on previous projects. Other rules may bar personal criticisms, (“you’re very stubborn”) versus criticizing behavior (“you would not listen to my side of the problem”).

It is very easy to get carried away with too many ground rules. You don’t want people to have to consult a lengthy document to decide how to handle an interpersonal situation. The ground rules should fit on one side of one piece of paper. Remember, the goal is to avoid wasting time in meetings or making bad decisions because people are  unprepared or rushed to make a decision.

Project Team Ground Rules: Project Meeting Scenario

A status report meeting I participated in some months ago lasted 2 hours. Approximately 20 people attended, including the project team, test leaders, team leaders, PMO staff, etc. The meeting had many elements that are considered best practices. They included the following:

  • all attendees sent the PM their issues before the meeting
  • the agenda was distributed before the meeting
  • no other issues were brought up in the meeting

Long story short, it went something like this. Each person went through the status report covering their work stream, what they did, what they were going to do, issues, risks, decisions to be made, etc. I noticed that after the first 30 minutes, some of the attendees lost interest. After one hour, most were either checking their phone or chatting about something with the person next to them. You can imagine how the situation was after 2 hours.

I share this example to make the point that following what are considered best practices does not mean you are efficient or effective. In the above example, if you calculate 20 people * 2 Hrs = 40 Hrs (40/8 =5PD) of effort for a single status meeting.  One meeting a week adds up to 260PD a year, which is a significant effort.

Project Team Ground Rules: The 30 Minute Meeting

Below is an approach that has worked for me. I call it the 30 minute meeting.

  1. Schedule important meetings early in the day. A meeting is a pit-stop (as in Formula One racing) where all the team members must get the overall picture. It must be kept short and to the point.
  2. The core of a status meeting is the status report. Prepare it beforehand. I like to prepare a presentation vs. a written document.
  3. A picture (or better a chart) shows no more than 1,000 words. The PM must give the bigger picture, showing all relevant charts in perspective. That includes the actual, planned, and forecast.
  4. All topics that are on track don’t need to be discussed one by one. They are only referenced in the status report (preferably in a chart). Include all the details in the appendix for the people who want to read it on their own time.
  5. Deal with topics that need bilateral attention outside the meeting. Time is precious so nobody is allowed to waste it. The PM must ensure the status meeting is not a place for everyone to dump their issues and problems.
  6. Keep it short and keep it clean. Be brave to exclude from the meeting all less relevant content. A short and to the point meeting is too important to be sacrificed for side topics.

Finally, a PM needs to keep the right balance of management overhead and actual work product in their meeting ground rules. My rule of thumb for overhead is not to exceed 10% of the total efforts. This approach to status report meetings works for me. It leaves the team energized, their attention sharp through the entire meeting and minimizes the management overhead.

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Top Down Project Plan

Dick Billows, PMP
Dick Billows, PMP
CEO 4pm.com
Dick’s Books on Amazon

Creating the project plan is the first step in every project. The best practice is a Top Down Project Plan. To be successful as a project manager, you always need a project plan but length is not important. An excellent project plan of one page works well. The important thing about the project plan is the thinking that goes into it.   Project Planning Main Page

Top Down Project Plan: A Best Practice 

The top down planning technique means we begin the planning process by knowing the result the customer or boss wants from the project. Part defining the result is spelling out the specific measurable criteria we (and the sponsor) will use to decide if the project succeeded. It can be something simple like, “Employees can get the supplies they need from the supply room in less than two minutes.” What’s important about that kind of definition is that it tells people what they’re going to get from the project.  As importantly, it tells them what they are not going to get. If there are managers who think employees should get their supplies in one minute, we need to clarify their expectations before we start work.

The project result is at the top of the project planning pyramid. We start there and then break it down into smaller pieces until we get to the level of team member assignments that are deliverables. We now have a pyramid with the overall project result at the top and smaller deliverables below. That hierarchy is our work breakdown structure (WBS). It’s the spine of the project. We add flesh to it by assigning people to the deliverables. Then we work with them to estimate the time and effort to produce the deliverables. One important piece is that we define every deliverable with measured acceptance criteria.  That way the boss knows what the project will deliver. And everybody working on the project knows precisely what he or she has to do. Everyone knows this before we start work.

The top down project plan needs to communicate several important things to the team and everyone who’s affected by the project. As we just discussed, we need to define what the project is going to deliver to the organization. Part of that definition is to spell out the specific measurable criteria we (and the sponsor) will use to decide if the project is a success. The measure of success can be something simple like, “Employees can get the supplies they need from the supply room in less than two minutes.” What’s important about that kind of definition is that it tells people what they’re going to get from the project.  As importantly, it tells them what they are not going to get. If there are managers who think employees should get their supplies in one minute, we need to clarify their expectations before we start work.

Second, the top down project plan also needs to communicate what resources we need to produce the planned result. How much time and money do we need? We also need to explain what authority we need to manage the project. We might ask for the authority to assign work directly to the project team members, even if they work in another department. Other items we might address are the risks the project faces and the help we need from management to defend the project from those risks.

Remember, this top down project plan can be short; one page. We project managers get into trouble when we write so much detail that no one reads it. When that happens, we can’t manage our stakeholders’ expectations for what they’re going to get and what they must invest to get it. Small Project Plan Techniques

Project Plan: The Wrong Way

The wrong way to do a project plan is to start by identifying the first task we’re going to do, then the second, then the third and so on. This “to do” list approach is easy and doesn’t need much thinking. But it has some downfalls. When we use this approach, we tend to include a lot of good ideas. But we don’t limit our plan to what we absolutely must do to deliver the result the boss wants. Since we don’t know exactly what the boss wants, we can’t decide how to deliver it. That results in doing many things that aren’t necessary. We also waste a lot of time and resources adding things to the project later on. These are vital things that we discovered too late. The “to do” list approach to project planning is faster but we wind up with projects that take longer and cost more than they should.

Top Down Project Plan: How To Do It

You may have managed projects for years using “seat of your pants” techniques. And you may have had some success.  Long-term success, however, requires you to use project planning best practices. Those are the skills needed to consistently deliver the scope on time and within budget. For small projects at an entry-level, a five-step method is enough. Here are the steps:top down project plan

  1. Planning – focused on a clear scope and a deliverable-oriented project plan and work breakdown structure (WBS). You also plan how you’re are going to do the next four steps.
  2. Scheduling and assigning work – create a schedule with project software so you can stay on top of your project’s progress. Assign work to your team members and give them a crystal-clear understanding of what you expect before they even start work.
  3. Estimating how much work it will take to produce each deliverable. It’s always best if the team member who’s going to do the work takes part in this estimating process. It’s more accurate and you get their commitment.
  4. Tracking progress against the plan and spotting variances – use project management software and status data from your team to spot problems early. This avoids unpleasant surprises late in the project.
  5. Designing corrective action and reporting status – design corrective action when you find problems. Then you clearly report the problems and propose solution options to the project sponsor.

You can learn this top down planning process in our online project management courses. You will be able to use these techniques so your projects finish on time and within budget. You’ll work privately with an expert project manager who is your coach and instructor. You may have as many phone calls and live video conferences as you wish. You begin when you wish and work on it at your pace and as your schedule allows. Take a look at the courses in your specialty.

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Lessons Learned on an Agile Project

Lately, the Agile Project Management approach has become very popular, and it seems that everyone is a scrum master. Here are lessons learned on an Agile project for every project manager. Now I have to disclose to you that I am not a certified Agile PM. I’m sort of a fan of the traditional approach, but more and more, Agile is taking over. What I would like to share with you today is a bit of a lessons learned from my first Agile project. Project Methodology Main PageLessons Learned on an Agile Project

First of all, Agile PM does not mean that we don’t have to plan, or that we can slack off on documentation. On the contrary, I want to warn you not to underestimate these two aspects of project management. When I was asked to take over one of our “projects in distress,” the project was three month behind schedule and the cost to implementation ratio was deep in the red. Our consultant had sold the idea of Agile PM and my company followed it. For the first three months of the project developers were talking to functional users and going through implementation cycles. The users rejected the implementations because something was missing or incorrectly implemented. Needless to say, there was not much documentation available. So when I took over this is what I did:

1) Organize a user training program about Agile Project Management. Being a newbie to Agile myself, I reached out to my colleague who had experience in Agile PM and we organized user training about this topic. We explained how Agile works, what we expected from users in terms of user story documentation, and what we would expect from our consultants. It turned out that this was a very important step because most of our users had no idea what a sprint was (gathering people involved in the project to focus on its development) and what was expected from them. Agile Project Management

2) Using elements from the traditional project management approach, I redefined and documented the sprint cycles, communications plan, and general project structure. As a result, each sprint now required an official sprint scope document that clearly outlined which topics were in the scope for the sprint. Moreover, I established clear deadlines for submission of user requirements and specifications. The goal was to establish a fair environment for both the functional users and the developers. I expected the users to tell me what they needed, I asked for agreement between functional users and developers on what was possible in a sprint, and I expected the agreed-upon scope to be implemented.

3) If you work in implementation sprints, it is easy to loose sight of the big picture. So I created a diagram that visualized the expected project objective and all user stories had to contribute to that goal. Project scope must be managed all the time.

Using elements from traditional project management, my colleague and I were able to turn that project around and I’m quite confident that we will end it with success. So what are the lessons learned? Even if you are not a certified Agile PM, you can manage an Agile project. Many aspects of a traditional project management approach should be used in Agile too. Planning might be a little different under Agile but it is still necessary. And so is scope management, communications management, procurement management, and cost controlling.

Until next time.

Managing Project Conflicts – Video

Managing project conflicts is a regular and ever-present part of a project manager’s life. For a project
Project conflictsmanager to have a consistently successful track record on his or her projects, they need to be able to resolve project conflicts.

Dick Billows, PMP
Dick Billows, PMP
CEO 4pm.com
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Some conflicts are project threatening. Those are the conflicts that involve disputes between executives and your project stakeholders over the very scope of the project and the acceptance criteria for deliverables. That level of conflict can yield significant damage to the project scope and budget. The project manager also has to resolve conflicts between team members where the impact of the conflict is less severe. However, conflict between team members can have an adverse effect on the productivity of the team. And it certainly impacts the level of collaboration between team members. On larger projects, the project manager is often dealing with a couple of project conflicts on each of those levels.
Project managers can resolve many conflicts using one of the five intervention techniques we’ll discuss below. The conflicts that are most easily resolved are situations where the project manager can work directly with the team members or stakeholders having the conflict. He or she can then use one of the techniques we will discuss to fix it (or at least reduce the impact on the project). Project Management Skills Main Page

Managing Project Conflicts Video

Watch this video showing two versions of conflict resolution: the wrong way and the right way for a project manager to handle a conflict. The first version has the project manager walking into a meeting with his team in the middle of a roaring conflict. The project manager does a reasonably good job of taking control but then makes a major mistake regarding what he focuses on. The project manager’s conflict resolution should be aimed at minimizing damage to the project, not making friends among everyone on the project team. As a result of his error in the first version, the project manager makes the situation worse. In the second version, the conflict is the same but the project manager uses a much more focused approach to handling the conflict. It is more effective and decreases the damage to the project.

Project Team Conflict

 

Other conflicts can’t be resolved that directly because they have deeper roots in the organization’s politics. This second group of conflicts can have a much more damaging impact on the project. That’s because they involve the organization’s executives rather than being confined to project team members and stakeholders. In this type of conflict the people involved often represent other, usually higher ranking, stakeholders. Too often PMs see these entrenched conflicts as impossible to resolve and simply accept the damage they will have on the project. But rather than give up, project managers should use techniques to manage those difficult conflicts to minimize the damage to the project’s results. The project manager must engage on a political level in the organization.